The Top 10 Easy Ways You Can Appreciate Teachers

This week is Teacher Appreciation Week here in the United States. As a teacher, I probably do have a little bit of bias when it comes to what I am getting ready to say, but I know I am right when I say that teachers are the most overworked and underpaid and underappreciated profession around. Education is the only career field I can think of that has to deal everyone – even those without education degrees – throwing their two cents in about how we can fix our flawed educational system. Let me remind you: opinions are like assholes. Everybody has one, but we do not always need to see yours. In addition to dealing with people’s “magic fixes” for our educational system we also get to deal with statements like “you only work nine months out of the year anyway. How could you possibly expect a higher salary?” I could do 10 whole blog posts where I discuss how much rage that brings me. And yes, I have actually had someone say that to me.

With all that said, I do not want this to be negative. I want this to be a celebratory post because teachers are so important to our society (not to toot my own horn, but – toot toot!). So without further ado and in no particular order, I present to you the top 10 ways you can thank and appreciate your teacher this week:

  1. Write your teacher, your child’s teacher, or your former teachers a letter explaining how much you enjoyed them or you enjoyed their class.

While yes it would be nice for a higher salary and all that jazz, at the end of the day, every single teacher I know wants to feel like they made an impact in a student’s life. We definitely don’t get told enough when we do so take the time this week and let us know.

2. Support us in the Classroom.

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I am sure everyone has seen the cartoon above at least once before so you know it is definitely true. Every single year of my teaching career I have parents try to talk me out of assigning the grade their child earned and instead give them a grade they did not deserve. Support us when it comes to the grades your child earned because I will not compromise my integrity and forge a grade and we could really use your support to get your children to see they need to do better. Once you make them see that, we can all three sit down together and figure out how we can help them do better. We could also use your support in regards to behavior and discipline. For the record. Little Timmy is telling you lies. He WAS talking. I DID warn him. Now back us up with the punishment that comes with it.

3. Support Us Outside the Classroom

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Just because we aren’t always in the classroom doesn’t mean you can’t still support us. When you hear people make negative comments about school teachers call them out on it. When we go on strike (I know it is frustrating to you, but we are trying to live and support families – strikes are sometimes necessary), join us on the strikes. Most importantly, however, is VOTE. Vote for politicians who are pro-public education.

4.  Communicate with us more than just when your child is not doing well/in trouble.

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Most high school teachers like myself have over 100 students that we are responsible for imparting knowledge to. It is not always feasible or timely for me to call home when an issue arises, and it is just downright difficult for me to return every single email or call at the end of the quarter over grades. Sometimes I don’t know something that I should no in regards to your child. It would be nice to know that upfront and after the fact, It also shows us they have a parent at home who cares and we love seeing that. If we communicate with each other early and often it will do nothing, but double your child’s chances of success.

5.  Volunteer to donate supplies or to take some Task off Our Hands.

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For supply money, Greenville County School District gives me $250 dollars for materials each year. That’s it. I have spent at least double that amount and thankfully I have nice parents who are willing to help me out with supplies as well. Most of us work multiple jobs and we still barely make ends meet. We will never turn down supplies. If we can’t use it, we know someone who will. For tasks, we have a lot on our plate. Offering to run copies or coordinate emails to the class, or chaperoning a field trips seem like small tasks, but they are huge weights off our shoulders.

6.   We’ll Take More Coffee/Coffee Gift Cards, But for the Love of God No Mugs!

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Most teachers I know run on caffeine. We could us IV drips. Until that happens, a nice Starbucks gift card goes a long way. Seriously though, no mugs! We have a million. Every variation of World’s Best Teacher you can find, and I have a weird last name so you won’t find one that says, Mr. Boliek. So just save the time and give us a nice Hallmark card with a Starbucks card thrown in and we will feel super appreciated!

7.  We are going to make mistakes. We are humans too – forgive us.

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With over 100 students to look after and with many other responsibilities, sometimes we are stretched to thin and something doesn’t go the way you or I wanted it to. Give us the opportunity to own up to it and apologize. Then forgive us and help us move on. Trust us – when we screw up, it bothers us more than it bothers you.

8. Be Involved and Engaged With Your Kid Regurlarly

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Nothing plays a bigger role in your child’s success (other than their own effort of course) than your involvement in their educational career. I could be the best teacher in the world and if you don’t show engagement and interest in your children’s educational accomplishments then eventually they will stop caring and trying. All it takes is a few questions here and a few “good jobs!” there. Help them with their homework even. It will show that you think education is important and you get to spend quality time with them. It’s a win-win. Or a win-win-win because the teachers usually get better behaved students and better quality work when parents are involved.

9. Get Informed – Know About Current Edu. Events & Policy Issues.

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This one you really should do anyways, but if you aren’t up to date already get up to speed quick. The sanity of your children’s teachers depends on it. And with someone like Betsy Devos running the Department of Education, we need knowledgable parents to help us get back on the right track.

10.  BUY. THE. FREAKING. PENCILS.

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When you see the school supply list at the beginning of the year, and it says pencils and notebook paper, please go buy the notebook paper and pencils. If you take the attitude of “I am not going to buy it because they will end up giving it to them anyways.” then you, my friend, are a terrible person. 99% of the time, teachers end up having to buy materials for their students whose parents refused to buy them the supplies. Most teachers salaries are well below what they should be. Don’t make them pay for items that you can afford for your children. To drive the final point home, let a Target Mom explain why you should buy the pencils.

To all the teachers out their, take a moment and enjoy this week. You earned it. You deserve a lot more than you are going to get. You are awesome!

And to Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. Callaghan, Mrs. Goetz, Mrs. Cothran, Mrs. Norris, Mrs. Van Dyke, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. Edwards, Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Wharton, Mrs. Butler, Mrs. Carden, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. McKamy, Dr. Wolfe, Mrs. Brown, Mr. Lee, Dr. Ground, Mr. Smith, Coach Cook, Mrs. Barber, Mrs. Bartlett, Mr. Linn, Señora Larrain, Dr. Lochridge, and Mr. Duncan – Each of your played a role in making me the person I am today. In case I never told you then, which I probably didn’t, thank you for what you did. Some of you will never know how much you truly impacted my life and I don’t mean just when it comes to academics. Some of you got me through some very hard personal matters as well. And for that you will not only hold the title of kick ass teacher, you now hold the title of kick ass friend!

 

 

 

Opened Eyes: Checking My Privilege to Experience Poverty

Before I begin I want to acknowledge the privilege that I was blessed/lucky enough to have been born into. If we are talking about winning the family lottery I came pretty close to winning the PowerBall. Being born male in an upper middle class stable family where I was raised by both my parents in an ultra-loving home has afforded me many experiences that were not afford to other people. When you add in the extra privilege that comes with being born white, I truly have lived a life that has given me significantly more than I deserve and significantly more than it has given to most people. I feel no need to apologize for this and I feel no shame at this either – I cannot help the family that I was born into. I feel no guilt in this either. I am active in my community and I have made it a point in my life to strive to always fight for social justice in my community when I see and read about things that aren’t socially just. So I am fully aware at how lucky and privileged I am; it is because of that privilege I want to write this – everyone should be able to be as lucky as I have been.

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If you do not understand the concept of privilege, the above quote should help. If you still do not understand privilege, please click here or here for further explanation.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) has made it a cornerstone of its church message to be a message of Radical Inclusion and Radical Hospitality. As a lifelong member of Trinity Lutheran Church here in Greenville, I am filled with pride that my church has boldly taken on this message of inclusion and hospitality as something we stand behind and embrace wholeheartedly. As part of that radical inclusion, my church makes it clear that we are a church for all peoples. At the beginning of our church bulletin it states the following:

“We celebrate people of all races, cultures, genders, ages, sexual orientations, gender identities, physical or mental abilities, socioeconomic statuses, appearances, family status, and citizenship as equally loved and valued in the eyes of God and in this place. All are invited to join this community as we worship God, grow in faith, and strive to love and serve one another.”

The amount of pride I feel romans-8-39in my church family for including these words in the welcome we extend to others cannot be stated enough. As a member of a community that is routinely cast out from churches, told they are not welcome, and that they are less than worthy of God’s love it has done so much for my relationship with God, but it has done a lot for other’s relationships as well. I have told many of my LGBTQ brothers and sisters that they should join me at church because the God I love created us all and that my church is great enough to recognize that by welcoming all into the fold. God is a shepherd of all sheep, even the rainbow sheep I joke! Because nothing, especially the way we are born can separate us from the unconditional love that is our God’s love.

As part of the radical hospitality aspect of the ELCA teaching and practices, this evening my church participated in a poverty and homelessness simulation that was facilitated by Beth Templeton with the organization Our Eyes Were Opened. I can tell you as one of the about 100 members of my church who participated that the organization truly lives up to its name. My eyes were opened. I know there is poverty all around me in this great city I call home. I know about the unseen Greenville. I teach at a school were 85% of my students would be considered as living below the poverty line. With that said I have never experienced it firsthand for myself. I have never felt the fear and helplessness that come with poverty. This simulation is as close as I have come to feeling those feelings first hand; and if the feelings I experienced this evening are anything close to the real feelings that my students or neighbors experience on a regular basis I will pray to God this evening and all my future evenings on this Earth I never have to experience that in real life. I will pray to God that my students and neighbors are lifted up and out of poverty. And I will pray to God that he show me a way to be more hospitable, less quick to rush to judgement, and help me find a way to help my students and neighbors in Christ out of poverty as well.

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One out of every 4 children in the United States lives in a food insecure household. Food insecurity is the state of being without a reliable source of affordable food on a regular basis.

In the scenario we were divided up into different “families” or “households” as we worked our way through a month of time in the scenario. Each week during the month last about 15-20 minutes. During the scenario I was with two fellow church members. Our back story was I was a 21-year-old community college student. My other group members were 13-year-old twin sisters. We had a teddy bear who played our 3-year-old younger brother. Our father was incarcerated so I was the technical head of the household. We were given some money (not nearly enough) and a list of expenses for each week before the scenario started. In order to not give away too much of the scenario – because I cannot stress enough how much you should all look into taking it – I will leave a lot of the details of the scenario under wraps. I am going to tell you how it felt.

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18.4% of Greenville residents with income live below the poverty level. 64.8% of those same households have children under the age of 18.

Once we read through our scenario, I felt relieved, but still slightly nervous. Because all three of my siblings were in child care, I knew they would have a safe spot (school) to go during the week. I was also thankful that our rent had already been paid for the month. If we had to pay our rent I know we would have ended up homeless because it would not have been possible. I had a spirit of determination to make it through this simulation. That spirit of determination all but dissipated by the end of week 1. In the first week in order for us to eat I pawned both our television and stereo system. I had some money left over, but it was not enough to pay any of the variety of monthly bills we had to pay. I did not attend community college at all during the first week because I thought it was more important to please my inner fat girl than my inner college professor.

Week 2 I found some religious organizations that were able to help out my family some and I was able to pay a few bills. I was starting to think we might make it to the end of the month. When I arrived home at the end of the week, one of my siblings was arrested and sent to juvenile hall and I had an unexpected bill waiting on us. At this point I cried for the first time during the simulation. I thought I was doing pretty good because I had managed to buy food once again. There was so much happening and I had no clue where to turn for help or what I should do first. I like being in control of my own choices and at this point I was not in control of just about anything. Just like week 1,I did not attend community college in week 2.

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48% of Greenville County School District Students are eligible for free or reduced lunches.

Week 3 of the simulation was interesting because it was a school holiday all week. I had to figure out what to do with my teenaged twin sisters and 3-year-old brother. I chose to take my brother with me and leave my sisters alone at home. This was the first week I figured out the nightmare of going through the process of applying for government assistance. It took forever to go through the line, fill out the paperwork, and wait my turn. Luckily I was approved for an EBT card (food stamps). I stopped sweating for a minute to buy food for the week and pay one more bill. At the end of the week I returned home and sat down to rest for a few brief moments before horror set in. I had left my younger brother at the Social Services office. I cannot tell you how many times I have seen news stories like these on the news and I have been quick to rush and pass judgement on these people. I was filled with a sense of shame. I was capable of forgetting something so important that I would never do in real life – I was no different from those parents on the news. And since I am sure you were wondering: I didn’t go to community college this week either.

As week 4 got under way I was determined to get everything done. I paid one bill and I used our EBT card to by more food. Since this was the last week of the month and I saw we had money left on our EBT card I started to think: I should trade what is left on our card for money so I can use that to pay bills. Something that is technically against the law because it is fraud came to mind as the perfect solution. I did not even think twice about whether or not to do it. I just tried to find someone to buy my card. If it came between me and my family losing our electricity and potentially our home then dammit I am selling that piece of plastic. I couldn’t find anyone to buy the card so the last week of the month I guess we would have lost our electricity. I guess at the end of the day we didn’t really need the electricity because I don’t need to see my community college textbooks since I did not go to class this week either.

As I look back over this activity and reflect on my own thoughts and feelings a few things stick out to me  For the sake of brevity I am simply going to list them below:

  1. If you leave near, at, or below the poverty line you need to be real good at planning. If you are not one of those people who has the skills it takes to sit down and plan out what you are going to pay each week of the month at the beginning of the month you are going to find living super difficult.
  2. Don’t rush to pass judgement on government workers. During the simulation the people in the roles of government workers did not look me in the eye once. Their tone was harsh and cold. Their answers were not helpful in directing me where to go next. However, during the discussion the facilitator raised an excellent point. These workers see the same heartbreaking stories over and over and over again. Day in and day out. At some point you have to close off that piece of caring you have for the survival of your soul. If I worked in a job were I had to look teenaged mothers in the face and tell them there was nothing I can do to help them every day I would have to do the same thing those government workers do.
  3. Acknowledge your privilege. Most of “us” do not see poverty because most of you reading this will be living lives well above the poverty line. I had no idea the poverty line among our students and children was so high until I started working at Southside and did my own research. Most of also don’t see poverty because people surround themselves with people who look, act, think, work, and live like themselves. 90% of the people reading this will be white (my estimation – not scientific), but the people living below the poverty are disproportionately people of minority communities, people who are disabled, and people who are victims of violence, abuse, or sexual assault. People who are different from you. Open yourselves to these people and help them – because you will also help yourself.
  4. We need usury laws in South Carolina. In the State of South Carolina, when you go to get a cash advance or cash a check any of those lending places you go to can charge whatever percent they want. There is no limit. The fact that some of these shady cash advances places take advantage of those among us who need the most help is both disgusting and needs to change. Now.
  5. Stop the “They need to get jobs!” Narrative. I cannot tell you how many times I have heard people exclaim that those on government assistance need to get off their asses and find work. Politicians in this very state have likened people receiving welfare to feeding stray animals.
  6. We can make our society better by loving our neighbors – all of them.  During the simulation small little things stuck out to me. Even as my family was struggling to make ends meet I still found myself listening in to other people’s conversations with workers and organizations who were supposed to help lift people out of poverty and offering them my own advice when they got no answers to their questions. Twice during the simulation different people gave me money for bus transportation. And during the last week of the simulation I made eye contact with the pawn shop lady. I am pretty sure she offered my a second amount that was higher than what she originally offered me because she knew I was about to burst into tears.

If we loved our neighbors like we loved ourselves, our city would be a much better place.

Our state would be a much better place.

Our Nation would be a much better place.

Our world would be a much better place.

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It would be a place where there would be no judgement of our neighbors perceived laziness and inability to work.

A place where there would be no hatred of social workers who have one of the toughest jobs around.

It would be a place where children wouldn’t have to skip school or community college to put food on the table for their siblings.

It would be a place full of love and devoid of poverty – and that is the kind of place I want to live. Hopefully, you do as well.

-WB