Flipping the Peacock…

June is one of my favorite months of the year, for many reasons. As a teacher, I have always enjoyed June because it is the first chance most of us in the trenches get to unwind and breathe after the craziness that is a 180-day school year. In addition, I have fond memories of annual beach trips with family and friends to North Litchfield, Pawley’s Island and Edisto Beach. Finally, if I am being quite honest, I enjoy the days where if I don’t want to leave my house I don’t have to and if I don’t want to change out of my pajamas, I don’t. There – I said it.

This year, however, June is even more important. I would go so far as to say that this June is momentous or historic. What makes this June any more special than any of the other Junes? Why should this one stand out and be celebrated? The answer can be found in tiny little bar on the island of Manhattan in Greenwich Village – The Stonewall Inn.

On June 28, 1969, 50 years ago today, the Stonewall Inn was one of the few gay bars in operation in New York City. The mafia-owned bar with no liquor license was the favored “safe place” of many of societies outcasts at the time (LGBT teen runaways, trans people, prostitutes, minor drug dealers, etc.) and was subjected to monthly police raids. The raid in June 1969 happened on the 28th, but it went differently than previous raids. This time, the fairies stood their ground and fought back.

According to most stories, a large crowd gathered and began questioning why the officers were mistreating and arresting patrons of the bar. Waiting longer than usual for the Patty Wagons to arrive, a butch lesbian names Stormé Delervarie repeatedly escaped from and fought with officers to avoid being arrested. She reportedly yelled “WHY ISN’T ANYBODY DOING ANYTHING?!” before being hit repeatedly with batons and roughly shoved into the wagon. When the crowd saw her bloodied face, they went berserk. At this, Stonewall Sheroes Marsha P Johnson and Sylvia Rivera threw bricks in the direction of the officers and through the front window of the bar. And just like that, the modern Gay Rights Movement was born.

Starting in June 1970 and continuing every year since then, a Pride Parade has been held in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots. As time has passed, the entire month of June has officially become Pride Month; and like clockwork, every year come the grumblings from privileged people in our society asking why a pride month is necessary. That question is quickly followed by someone chiming in to ask why there is no straight pride month.

Usually, I just ignore the question because I feel it is so stupid that to acknowledge it with a response would be to give it more credit than it deserves (which is none). Not this year. This year is too important to the movement to not answer the question. So, to finally silence the critics, here are the reasons why Pride is important.

1. It is a Reminder of our Historic Contributions

You cannot be proud of who you are if you do not acknowledge the past, and history is full of important LGBTQ people who have given the world so much. And for the record, I am not just talking about Broadway musicals, either. Some of the most influential people in world history were LGBTQ people, including Alexander the Great, Hatshepsut, and Leonardo Da Vinci. The world would have been very different now had Alan Turing, a gay man, not created the computer that eventually allowed the Allied Powers to crack the Nazi codes and bring the war to a much quicker end.

Without LGBTQ people, the first woman in space wouldn’t have inspired hundreds of girls into becoming scientists and astronauts. There would be no The Matrix franchise and countless other movies and books. There would be no Sheldon Cooper and no Ellen Degeneres. There would have been no March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. There would not have been heroes on a highjacked airplane who saved lives by sacrificing their own to take back the plane on the morning of September 11th.

2. It is a Love Letter to our Chosen Family

When it comes to our families, LGBTQ people have not always “won the genetic lottery.” Many LGBTQ people are disowned by their families and thrown out into the streets. The majority of homeless youth in this country identify as LGBTQ and while in that moment most people believe they have no place to go and nobody to help, we pick each other up, and we form chosen families. These families run deeper than most biological families, because these families are built on unconditional acceptance and love. In the two video clips below from the historic and groundbreaking FX series Pose, you can see aspects of how Chosen Families form and function. The first clip highlights house mother Blanca’s relationship with Damon, one of her children throughout the first season. The second clip shows how similar house mother’s can be real mothers with an argument between Blanca and another one of her children, Lil Papi.

I have yet to attend a pride related function that wasn’t completely filled with love and warmth. It is nothing but supportive chosen families loving each other and showing their families off. Even the street preachers and protestors are met with love and support. If you have never been to a pride event before, this reason alone is a reason to go – just take some tissues with you for the happy tears that will invariably flow while you are there.

When the world followed President Reagan’s lead and turned his back on the LGBTQ community as thousands of young men began dying of AIDS we picked each other up from the pits of despair and we raised money for research. We buried our brothers and sisters. We became our own families because that was what we had to do.

3. Its a Celebration of Achievements

In the 50 years since the Stonewall Riots, the world has completely changed for people who are part of the LGBTQ community. What was once considered a mental disorder by doctors is now seen differently. In 50 years we have seen:

  • The End of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell
  • The End of the Defense of Marriage Act
  • The Legality of Same Sex Marriage Nation-wide
  • An increased push from major politicians to support the equality Act
  • A sitting Democratic President announce support for same sex marriage
  • The Passage of the Matthew Shepherd Hate Crimes Act
  • Openly Gay politicians, included a married gay man currently running for president.
  • Stonewall becoming the first place on the National Historic Monument registry to be recognized solely for its importance to the Gay Rights Movement.

In a span of 50 years, that amount of progress is historic. So forgive us as we celebrate that fact. But if you are a fan of glitter, short shorts, pop music, and yelling “YAAASSSSS QUEEN!,” by all means, come join the party.

4. It is a Chance to be “Normal”

For many people – especially those in more rural or conservative areas – Pride is the only time of the year for people to take advantage of the many things most cisgendered, heterosexual people take for granted. Things like walking down the street holding the hand of their same-sex spouse. Or a quick kiss while you wait on the sidewalk for an Uber. Or walking in your short shorts and tank top to meet your friends for some drinks. Or spending the night dancing with your friends in a club.

It might seem silly that those are brought up, but for most people in the LGBTQ community, it is the truth. There is not a gay person I know who hasn’t received dirty looks, been called a homophobic or derogatory slur, or been on the receiving end of actual physical violence because they were a little bit different. This includes Sean Kennedy, who was a year older than me in high school. He was the first openly gay person I ever met and we had art class together. I always found him funny and he was always nice to me. I learned so much about life in that class from him. Towards the end of my senior year in high school, Sean was tragically assaulted and beaten to death as he left a restaurant in Greenville with some friends because of his sexuality. I often think of him as Pride rolls around every year, because I know I would run into him during one of the events held.

Sean Kennedy. The first and one of the funniest openly gay people I have ever had the honor of meeting and considering a friend.

5. It is Flipping the Bird to All the Negativity.

Society has always had a fear of things that are different from the majority or what is considered normal. This is not just true of people, either. In nature, a flock will attack any bird that is more colorful than the others because being different is seen as a threat. The first Pride was a riot – in the form of a big middle finger to a discriminatory police department. The second pride in 1970 was a middle finger to society telling us we should remain silent. If there is one thing the LGBTQ community has never been really good, however, that would have to be remaining in the shadows away from the spotlight.

Pride is our chance to give those who would seek to keep the LGBTQ community harm or keep us in the shadows a big middle finger. It does not matter whether it is a reality tv President and his homophobic and bigoted followers or if it is a sheriff/pastor who stands in the pulpit urging his congregation to kill gay people. Our middle finger message to both and all the others in between is simple: We exist. We are NOT going anywhere. That in spite of all your attempts to silence us, to change us, to hate us, to scare us, and to kill us, we are not going to be defeated. No now. Not ever.

Why do we have pride? We have pride because we take all the hatred, discrimination, fear, violence, homophobia, anger, and rage that is constantly rained on our community and we THRIVE. How? By turning the rain you have thrown at us into a fucking rainbow. And for that, we will always be proud!

-WB

Ellen Degeneres Does Not Speak for Me

The Back Story on How We Got Here

Kevin Hart is a good comedian. He is charismatic, and his comedic timing is exceptional. It is easy to see why the Academy would want him to host the 2019 Oscars – especially considering the fact the Academy is desperately trying to lure younger viewers. I was not mad when they picked Kevin Hart as this year’s host. Although he is not my favorite comedian, I recognize his talent. Also, as someone who has not hosted before, he could bring fresh ideas to a show that can be stale and stuffy. That thinking is all in the past, however, and Kevin Hart has nobody to blame for this except himself.

The pictures above are just a small sampling of the several dozen tweets from Hart’s verified Twitter account. Most of the offensive and homophobic tweets come from 2010 and 2011. This means that someone had to spend time scrolling through thousands of tweets and sound bites to try and find one little statement that is offensive or considered not politically correct. I want to start by saying I think this is a dangerous path for us as a society to go down. I do not think it is fair for us to judge a person based on their beliefs from 10 years ago. People change and so do their beliefs. The Kevin Hart of 10 years ago is not the Kevin Hart of today. Just like the Wynne Boliek of 10 years ago is not the Wynne Boliek of today.

‘Actions Speak Louder than Words’

I want to take Kevin Hart at his word. I want to believe him, but I am also a firm believer in “actions speak louder than words.” Kevin, your actions have shown me that you are not sorry. That you think you have done nothing you need to apologize for. Your actions, as well as your recent comments have shown that you feel like you are victim here. That you should be treated as St. Kevin, the martyr. I hate to break it to you Kevin, you are wrong.

Some of you may be sitting there asking well how should he have responded or what should he have done to demonstrate his remorse for his language. I will point to Kyler Murray as an example of how to respond. Kyler Murray immediately released a statement on his own, as well as a joint statement with GLAAD. He statement acknowledged his mistake and he owned it by apologizing. Also, when he was asked about it in interviews he seemed to show genuine remorse for the comments. This is in short, the exact opposite of what Kevin Hart did.

Kyler Murray, Heisman Trophy Winner from Oklahoma and a better human being because he owns his mistakes and tries to learn from them.

Kevin has said on his social media accounts as well as in interviews that he thinks this is nothing more than trolls trying to start up drama. While I will be the first to admit my coifed hair is enviable, the last time I checked, I did not have a bejeweled belly button. Those of us concerned have legitimate cause to be concerned that a person who is homophobic could host the event know as “The Gay Super Bowl.” That a homophobe could host the Oscars in a year in which Rami Malek, Melissa McCarthy, Merhershala Ali, Richard E. Grant, Emma Stone, and Lucas Hedges could all be nominated for stellar performances of LGBTQ characters.

Self-Appointed Spokesgay Ellen

More alarming than all of the reasons above many of us are now concerned that one of the most visible and most popular LGBTQ people in the world has come to Kevin Hart’s defense. On her show this past Friday, Ellen Degeneres gave Kevin Hart 9 uninterrupted minutes to speak his thoughts on the whole debacle. She then interviewed in with the most gentle questioning I have ever seen. They weren’t even playing softball- we are talking t-ball territory. The icing on the delusional cake, is Ellen defending Hart, backing up his claims that those of us who are concerned about his language are trolls, AND THEN saying she things he should still host. She went so far as to call the Academy and try to intercede to get him to host. The videos of this are posted below.

I have loved Ellen Degeneres and her talk show since they have been on air. We share a love of dancing, laughing, and loving life. I genuinely believe she is one of the best people on the planet because she uses her enormous influence and platform for good. On a side note, she also makes FANTASTIC bedding sold at Bed, Bath, and Beyond as well – I have never had a comforter this soft before. This is why I was shocked and saddened and angered by Ellen’s comments. They feel like a betrayal of the community that wrapped its arms around her and stood by her when all the straight people left her after she came out of the closet. A betrayal of the very community that she is a member of.

Ellen is entitled to her opinion. She is allowed to want Kevin Hart to be forgiven and to be the host of the Oscars. What Ellen is not allowed to do is forgive Hart on behalf of the entire LGBTQ community. You don’t get to give a blanket apology. You don’t get to use your influence to bully those of us in the community who are still hurt, upset, and giving the Academy and Kevin Hart some Makayla Mulroney-worthy side eye. You don’t get to say all is well, because all is not well.

An Insult to Two Communities

Ellen’s comments and actions are a betrayal to other communities besides the gay community. Perhaps the biggest betrayal the comments hurts is communities of color – specifically the black community. While long a traditionally democratic/liberal voting group, the black community has been slow to support same-sex marriage. Before its legalization across the country, only 30% of the black community supported same sex marriage. 40% of the homeless gay youth in this country are African-American. 62% of homeless transgendered youth are black. Black trans people are 7 times more likely to be murdered than their white counter parts. Ellen trying to absolve Kevin Hart of his offensive language is more than just wrong – its flat out dangerous. Don Lemon, eloquently and emotional covers this on a segment of his show.

Final Thoughts

First: People will continue to say “That’s gay – stop that!” as an insult and there is nothing we can do to stop that. I have been called derogatory slurs hundreds of times before and I know I will here them again in the future. Even though that word no longer has power over me, it still hits you square in the gut when it is hurled at you (and anybody is says otherwise is lying). Kevin Hart should not have to carry the sins of using that word for the entire world. Kevin Hart could have used this and his platform as a teachable moment to make the world better for all of us and he decided not to.

Second: There is a reason the Oscars is known as the gay Super Bowl. For many of us, especially those of us in rural areas and the south, the movies was our escape from a boring, unsafe, and unwelcome life. For many of us, myself included, the movies are one of the first times we saw someone who was like us. It made us feel not alone and a little less sad and afraid. The movies became our refuge and the fashion became our sanctuary. To have all of that belittled by a man and his toxic masculinity is wrong, disrespectful, and unwarranted. And to have that supported by Ellen make it sting even more.

Third: Kevin Hart Speaks for himself. Through his actions and through his statement he speaks volumes by saying he doesn’t give a damn about the feelings of the LGBTQ community. And I truly believe he doesn’t think he has anything to apologize for – which is why he has technically never said the two words “I’m Sorry.” That alone should speak volumes.

Finally: Although we love Ellen, (more than you do as a matter of fact. We stuck by her when you all fled. Something even Ellen seems to have forgotten) Ellen is not our spokesperson. She does NOT speak for all of us in the gay community. There was no Gay Conclave where we elected Ellen Pope of the gays so she could put out edicts and decrees in the name of the Gays. Ellen speaks for Ellen. And I speak for myself and myself alone – and the words I choose to speak are Kevin Hart, his homophobic past, and his unapologetic actions in the present are both unwelcome and not needed as this year’s Oscars Awards Ceremony.

-WB

Happy Birthday, Harvey Milk- The Hero Who Gave Us Hope

Today would have been the 98th birthday of Harvey Milk. For the average American, that might not mean anything to you. You may not even know who Harvey Milk was. But to the LGBTQ+ community, Harvey Milk is a hero, an icon, and a martyr for the cause of LGBTQ rights. Harvey Milk was the first openly gay elected official in the United States. He was elected to the San Francisco Board of City Supervisors in 1977. 11 Months after his election, Milk was assassinated by a fellow member of the Board of Supervisors. The Mayor of San Francisco was also assassinated. In the few years before his election and his short time in public office, Milk became the Hero of Hope to the gay community.

harvey-milk_happybirthdayI am a history teacher. I am the person who was more excited to register to vote than I was to go buy a pack of cigarettes. I follow politics and current events so much that I can see my family tune out as soon as I open my mouth about politics 97% of the time. You would think I would have learned about Harvey Milk at a young age, but this could not be farther from the truth. I did not learn about Harvey Milk until 2008 as a freshman in college. It wasn’t a history book I have to think for teaching me about Harvey Milk either. History books in this nation leave out the stories and struggles of minority groups far too often. The people I have to thank for acquainting me with Harvey Milk are Dustin Lance Black, Gus Van Sant, and Sean Penn. Yes, you heard me correctly. I said the Academy Award winning actor Sean Penn.

In 2008 Sean Penn won an Oscar for playing Harvey Milk in the film titled Milk. The film was written by Dustin Lance Black (who you might have seen in the news for being the boyfriend and now husband of British diver Tom Daley) and directed by Gus Van Sant. Black and Van Sant are openly gay and both were nominated for their work on Milk. Black won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. His acceptance speech is less than 3 minutes in length and it changed my life.

At the 2009 Academy Awards, Milk was one of the few films that I As I watched the Gay Super Bowl Oscars that year, Black’s speech left me in disbelief. Yes this is a ceremony filled with people who are stereotypically liberal leaning in their political beliefs. But seldom are people so blatantly plain in their speeches. Here was a rather handsome man telling me that very soon LGBTQ+ people who have equal federal rights across this nation. And wouldn’t you know it – he was right!

 

Not having seen the movie, I googled the film and was astounded I had never heard of Harvey Milk, his story, or the film before the Oscars that night. A second google let me know I could pay $2 and watch the film at The Astro Theater in Downtown Clemson, SC. The Astro was Clemson’s version of a dollar theater. It typically showed films that had already been out for a month or so. It did not look like much on the inside, but I loved it for the historic charm it had. I skipped a science lab to go the next night. To this day, I don’t regret that decision.

 

 

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There were 4 other people in the theater that night. All 4 of those people were part of “the family.” We did not sit together and we did not know each other, but I had seen some of them in passing on campus before. I could effuse compliments about Milk until I am purple in the face so I will not go on and on about how much I love it. I will simply say that film changed my life and I will be forever grateful for the real Harvey Milk’s message of Hope and advocacy that are shown in the film. As the lights came on I tried to wipe the tears off my face. I started to get embarrassed until I saw the other 4 people were doing the exact same thing. Although I never became more than Facebook friends with any of the other 4 people, each time we saw each other in passing on campus, we would always nod and smile at each other. We shared a form of ourselves that evening that we had not shared with many people up until that point. The older I get the more I think certain things in this universe are connected. Call it God, or Karma, or my personal favorite juju. There was a shared connection between us and Harvey Milk that night. And it was life changing.

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The publicity poster from the film. The entire cast is phenomenal. 

This was the first film I had ever seen that depicted multiple main characters who were LGBTQ in a positive light. It is the first film I had seen that showed the power of my community when we stood up and advocated for ourselves – when we fought back against the people and politicians who sought to silence us and belittle us. The film goes through much of Milk’s adult life. It shows a closeted Milk living in New York City and keeping his sexuality a secret and follows parts of his life up until his assassination. Milk later moves to San Francisco in the 1970s. San Francisco became a haven for gay men in the 60s and 70s and Milk opened Castro Camera on Castro Street in the city. He lost his first election for the Board of Supervisors, but he quickly became a uniting force in “The Castro” – the area of the city made famous by the Castro Theater and the district with the largest concentration of gay people.

Once San Francisco moved away from at-large districts to area based districts Milk easily won in the heavy LGBT Castro District. Harvey Milk was a bridge builder. He united minority communities of all types and advocated for those groups regularly as part of the Board. He was instrumental in helping the city pass a gay rights ordinance at a time when many other cities were passing ordinances and ballot indicatives which were extremely anti-LGBTQ in nature. Milk was passionate in his belief that only by people in the LGBTQ community coming out and acknowleding their sexuality to their friends and family would opinions on LGBTQ people change for the better. Milk said :

Gay people, we will not win our rights by staying quietly in our closets. … We are coming out to fight the lies, the myths, the distortions. We are coming out to tell the truths about gays, for I am tired of the conspiracy of silence, so I’m going to talk about it. And I want you to talk about it. You must come out.

Sadly Harvey Milk would not live to see his beliefs become reality. He was taken by the bullets of an assassin in his office in city hall. In the video below, you will see US Senator Dianne Feinstein announce the deaths of both Moscone and Milk. If it looks like Feinstein is confused she has good reason to be. She just identified the bodies of both Milk and Moscone to police. As she tried to feel a pulse on Harvey Milk’s neck, she stuck her fingers into the hole left by the bullet that hit Milk in the neck.

White was a disgruntled former member of the board who had resigned, but wanted his seat back. both Moscone and Milk opposed putting White back on the board. White snuck into city hall, shot the mayor in his office before walking to Milk’s office and shooting him 4 times. White was arrested later that day. In response to the shooting, thousands of people from across San Francisco rushed and descended upon the Castro that evening. They marched silently with candles in a spontaneous memorial vigil in honor of Milk. To this day, it remains one of the most beautifully eloquent responses to an act of violence that this world has ever seen.

White was convicted months later of voluntary manslaughter for both killings and was sentenced to just 7 years in prison of which he only served 5. After the lenient sentencing was announced, the outrage in the LGBTQ community led to several nights of rioting throughout San Francisco in what have since become known as The White Night Riots. Harvey Milk’s friend and another icon in the gay community, Cleve Jones, led the way from the Castro towards city hall shouting “Out of the bars and into the streets!” By the time they reached city hall a thousand people were ready to riot. This is the impact that Harvey Milk had on the gay community. For a community that so often felt lost, alone, and vilified by the rest of the world, Harvey Milk was and still is a beacon of hope. The harbinger of hope was and still is a martyr for the movement. That movement is ongoing and we won’t stop until we accomplish what Milk set out to accomplish.

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Milk was featured on a US Postal Stamp in 2014. You can still order it on the Post Office Website.

I have always felt a connection to Harvey Milk – but in more ways than just the obvious one. Harvey milk taught at one point and while in California he was one of the driving forces behind the defeat of Proposition 6, which was an initiative on the California ballot that would have banned gays and lesbians from teaching in public schools. I have always believed that the LGBTQ community if far too concerned with their “own” letter in the acronym. As long as the L or the G part got their rights then who cares about the T or the Q? Harvey Milk knew that the only way for us to succeed was to help each other – and that included other oppressed minority groups as well. Lastly, and perhaps the most tragically of the connections, I was born on the tenth anniversary of Milk’s assassination. I find it somehow comforting in a weird way that a day that brings pain and anguish for many, brought happiness and joy to my family (or at least I think it brought them happiness and joy).

Hope will never be silent. As long as people have hope, they will always be capable of rising above the circumstances that life throws at them. Where there is hope, there is the undeniable chance that the human spirit will win out over despair. Over fear. Over anger. Over hate. The story of Harvey Milk was a pivotal turning point in my life. It changed a fundamental part of the person that I am today. The story of Harvey Milk saved Dustin Lance Black’s life, and it will continue to save the lives of countless people – but only if it is told. At the conclusion of his Oscar acceptance speech Black ends by thanking God for giving us Harvey Milk. I thank God for giving us people like Black, and Van Sant, and Penn who were brave enough to fight to have the story of Harvey Milk told. And yes after thanking God for them, I too thank God for Harvey Milk. Happy Birthday, Harvey Milk. Thank you for your sacrifice. And Thank you for the gift of hope.

-WB

imageTo learn more about Harvey Milk, go to The Harvey Milk Foundation website. The Milk foundation was founded by Milk’s nephew, Stuart Milk, and his former campaign manager, Anne Kronenberg, and it seeks to continue to strive for Milk’s dream of a better tomorrow – a tomorrow in which there is equality for all and a world without hate.

Say Her Name: Sasha Wall

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Today is a sad day for South Carolina, and most people have no idea. Most South Carolinians will never know, and this saddens me most of all. The only reason I discovered the sadness of today is because I accidentally stumbled across a tweet while reading information about the teacher walkouts in Oklahoma and Kentucky.  Randomly while scrolling through I saw a tweet from the Human Rights Campaign that had South Carolina as part of the 240 characters. As I braced for the worst I clicked on the link. My fears and disappointment were once again confirmed. I shouldn’t be surprised or sad by the news, with the reputation that our state has on accurately covering issues that effect the LGBTQ community – especially when it comes to the “T” in our umbrella of an acronym.

In the early hours of Easter morning, trans woman Sasha Wall was murdered in Chesterfield County in the lower part of South Carolina. She was found dead in her car on the side of a rural road. It is believed the car was left running for over 2 hours before someone stopped and called police. Sasha Wall was shot in the head, neck, and shoulder at least a dozen times. She was the same age as me (29 years old). On Easter morning.

Sasha Wall

We should not be shocked at Sasha Wall’s death. Trans women – especially trans women of color – have one of the highest homicide rates in the nation. Wall is the 8th trans woman murdered in 2018. Of those eight trans women, seven were people of color. At the current rate, 2018 will pass the number of trans people murdered in 2017 by the beginning of October.

Most people will live throughout 2018 and they will not know this. They will not know it, because the media continues to not report the facts on the murders of these people. Trans people have some of the least reported homicides in the nation. When add this fact in to the fact that the media reports homicides of people of color at a less accurate rate than the rates of caucasian people, trans women of color were doomed from the start.

What shocks and saddens me more than Sasha Wall’s murder, and more than the fact that many people will never know about this human being is the disgusting and wrong way that Sasha was covered by the press here in South Carolina. Of the papers I searched for in the area, the only two papers to report on the brutal homicide were The State paper in Columbia and The Post and Courier from Charleston. In both papers, Sasha Wall was misgendered and deadnamed. As if being murdered for simply existing was not indecent enough, both papers listed Wall as male and used the name she was given at birth. Both articles made mention of the fact friends, family, and Sasha’s place of employment referred to her as Sasha Wall, yet they continued to refer to her by the wrong name and the wrong gender.

People who look at the Black Lives Matter movement with disgust and disdain are quick to shout that “All Lives Matter! They are quick to express outrage and moral indignation when they hear that phrase. Well you know I hear now? I hear deafening silence. I hear silence from the media. I hear silence from the general public. I hear silence from the shouters of “All Lives Matter!” But most importantly of all, I hear that deafening silence from the others members of the LGBTQ community. For far to long, it has been “every letter for themselves” in our community. The apathy that the queer community has for each other is just more deafening silence. And all of that deafening silence from all of those people fills me with disgust. With disdain. With outrage. With moral indignation.

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Where is your disgust now?

Where is your disdain now?

Where is your outrage now?

Where is your moral indignation now?

You say that all lives matter. Now is your chance to prove it. Now is your chance to walk the walk. To put your money where your mouth is. To put up, or shut up. To prove once and far all that All lives matter. I want to hear your disgust for Sasha Wall. I want to her your disdain for her. I want to hear your outrage for her. I want to hear your moral indignation for her. To help drown out the deafening silence I will be there with you. I will shout my disgust, disdain, outrage, and moral indignation with you. I am guilty of that silence, but enough is enough.

Sasha Wall was a 29-year-old woman. She was a woman who was loved by her family and friends, and she was a woman who loved her family and friends. She was a woman with hopes and dreams and ambitions just like the rest of us. Sasha Wall deserved more. Sasha Wall deserved more than being left on the side of the road like discarded garbage. She was a woman who deserves justice she most likely will never see. I cannot bring her back. But I can and will say her name. I will say her name so somewhere her spirit knows that I see her for the person she was and for all she could have been. I say her name and the names of the other 7 women who deserved so much more:

  1. Christa Leigh Seele-Knudslien, 42 years old
  2. Viccky Gutierrez, 38 years old
  3. Celine Walker, 36 years old
  4. Tonya Harvey, 35 years old
  5. Zakaria Fry, 28 years old
  6. Phylicia Mitchell, 46 years old
  7. Amia Tyrae Berryman, 28 years old
  8. Sasha Wall, 29 years old

May God Bless Christa, Viccky, Celine, Tonya, Zakaria, Phylicia, Amia, and Sasha with the peace in heaven that they were so cruelly denied here on Earth. But more importantly, may be bless us with forgiveness for our deafening silence, and the strength to now and forever more, say shout their names.